Mosques, Mahals and Tombs at Mandu.

Visiting The Rewa Kund Group - Roopmati Pavilion and Baz Bahardur Palace at Mandu City and Fort, India.

Rupmati Pavilion (Roopmati Pavilion) sits on the edge of the precipice overlooking Nimar Valley and was thought to have been originally constructed for use as a watch tower. The various corridors within the building have really nicely designed arches and also examples of the extensive water features for which Mandu City and Fort were so well known.
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Rupamati Pavilion - Mandu City Fort, India.
Rupmati Pavilion
Rupamati Pavilion arches - Mandu City Fort, India.
Rupmati Pavilion arches
Rupamati Pavilion inside - Mandu City Fort, India.
Rupamati Pavilion inside
Rupamati Pavilion water system - Mandu City Fort, India.
Rupamati Pavilion water system
Baz-Bahardurs Palace was constructed by Nasirud-Din during 1508 A.D. on the slopes of the hill to the east of Rewa Kund. Apparently Baz-Bahadur frequently used the palace in order to be close to Queen Rupmati who spent a lot of time at Rewa-Kund. The Palace has a particularly beautiful tank as part of it's inner courtyard.
Rupamati Pavilion (Roopmati Pavilion) - Mandu City Fort, India.
Rupamati Pavilion
Baz Bahadur Palace - Mandu City Fort, India.
Baz Bahadur Palace
Baz Bahadur Palace tank - Mandu City Fort, India.
Baz Bahadur Palace tank
Baz Bahadur Palace tank - Mandu City Fort, India.
Baz Bahadur Palace tank
Baz Bahadur Palace tank - Mandu City Fort, India.
Baz Bahadur Palace tank
Baz Bahadur Palace - Mandu City Fort, India.
Baz Bahadur Palace
Mandu Fort Rewa Kund - Mandu City Fort, India.
Mandu Fort Rewa Kund
Mandu Fort Echo Point - Mandu City Fort, India.
Mandu Fort Echo Point

The following ruins, temples and buildings at Mandu City Fort are in between the "ticketted" locations so can be visited free of charge.


Dai-Ka Mahal and Dai-Ki-Chhoti-Bahan-Ka-Mahal were probably used as accommodation by favoured nurses and/or midwives from the Royal nursery and then the buildings were converted to tombs when they died. Dai-Ka Mahal stands on a tall base which contains rooms with arched openings for use by the Keepers of the Tomb. There are mains of circular towers to the north-east and south-east corners of the structure and at one time there were probably several pavilions. The tomb itself is in the centre of the terrace and located on the western side there is a mosque which has Hindu architectural aspects on it's balustrades and brackets.
Dai Ki Chhoti Bahan Ka Mahal - Mandu City Fort, India.
Dai Ki Chhoti Bahan Ka Mahal
Dal Ka Mahal Mosque - Mandu City Fort, India.
Dal Ka Mahal Mosque
Dal Ka Mahal Tomb - Mandu City Fort, India.
Dal Ka Mahal Tomb
Dal Ka Mahal - Mandu City Fort, India.
Dal Ka Mahal
Dai-Ki-Chhoti-Bahan-Ka-Mahal tomb is octagonal and has a nicely shaped dome which once was covered in coloured tiles. Constructed from red chiseled masonry it has four arched openings which face the four cardinal points - other parts of the structure have been decorated with the outlines of arches.
Lal Bagh Mahal Tomb - Mandu City Fort, India.
Lal Bagh Mahal Tomb
Carvan Sarai - Mandu City Fort, India.
Carvan Sarai
Mandu Fort ruins - Mandu City Fort, India.
Mandu Fort ruins
Malik Mughiths Mosque - Mandu City Fort, India.
Malik Mughiths Mosque
Malik Mughiths Mosque - Mandu City Fort, India.Malik Mughiths Mosque - Mandu City Fort, India.Carvan Sarai (pictures below) is a large Inn with vaulted ceilings in it's halls and was constructed around A.D. 1437. It has a large courtyard and the accommodation entrances are large enough to allow horses etc. inside - a layout which resembles the design of Medieval European Inns. Malik Mughith's Mosque (pictures on the right) was constructed by him in A.D. 1452 - his father was Mahmud Khilji of the Khilji Dynasty which ruled over Malwa untill 1531. The mosque is an example of the first phases of Muslim architecture in Malwa where materials from Hindu buildings were taken for construction of the Mosque. The mosque has arched corridors and the fairly small turrets at the corners all combine to give the building a very impressive look. Nilakantha Palace is actually the site of and named after an old Shiva Shrine. Constructed from red stone during the sixteenth century by Mughal Emperor Akbar, the building contains a nice water system which ends up in a small tank in it's centre.
Nilakantha Palace sluice - Mandu City Fort, India.
Nilakantha Palace sluice
Nilakantha Palace tank - Mandu City Fort, India.
Nilakantha Palace tank
Chorkot Chappan Mahal mosque - Mandu City Fort, India.
Chorkot Chappan Mahal mosque
Chorkot Chappan Mahal tomb - Mandu City Fort, India.
Chorkot Chappan Mahal tomb
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